Retail

Since 1997, our members have invested over €350 million through Repak to support packaging recycling in Ireland, and have helped to grow packaging recycling and recovery from under 15% in 1998 to 90% in 2016, with Ireland is now ranked one of the top performers in Europe for packaging recycling amongst the EU 27.

If your business would like to be featured on this page, please contact us at info@repak.ie

ABOUT OUR MEMBERS

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NEXT is committed to working to reduce the amount of waste it generates wherever possible from within its operations as it continues to grow as a business, and to reuse or recycle more of the waste it does produce to divert it from landfill. Within its retail stores its employees play a vital role in effectively separating and segregating recyclable materials for return to its in-house recycling centre to minimise the waste being sent to landfill.
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Tesco is always looking for ways to minimise product packaging, whether in store or from its suppliers. Its reusable plastic crates - known as Green Trays - were introduced into its distribution chain as an environmentally-friendly method of delivering products to stores. The hard-wearing plastic crates, which last an average of 10 years, take the place of secondary cardboard and plastic packaging in distribution.
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Aldi Ireland’s goal is to send zero waste to landfill. Approximately 30% of its total waste is general waste, with 75% of this diverted from landfill. Aldi’s efforts are focused on our own label products and we aim to record the packaging weight of all our core range products. The majority of waste produced by its operations is cardboard and plastic packaging and it recycles close to 100% of these materials. Cardboard and plastic are segregated in store, baled and returned to regional distribution centres.
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Environmental awareness is a crucial part of Lidl's goal of working towards A Better Tomorrow. Since opening its doors in 1994, Lidl has always encouraged its customers to reuse their plastic shopping bags by applying a small fee. By doing this, it has saved millions of plastic bags from going to landfill.
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Penneys, the name under which Primark operates in Ireland, ensures the company's full compliance with the obligations of the Republic of Ireland Waste Management Packaging Regulations. Penneys is progressively replacing plastic carrier bags with paper bags, thus reducing further its impact on the environment. It is also committed to increasing the levels of recycling within its stores, particularly for cardboards, plastics and hangers.
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Since 2012, Marks and Spencer have been zero waste to landfill across our own operations in the UK and Republic of Ireland. Its Plan A 2025sets a bold new goal to be a zero waste business across all that it does – its operations, supply chains and when its customers come to remove packaging and use its products. This includes designing products and packaging to underpin the creation of a circular economy in the markets it serves.
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Dublin and Cork Airports manage contracted waste service providers to ensure that waste is handled appropriately at the terminal and across the airport campuses. DAA has developed a Waste Management Strategy (2014 – 2017) with the following key goals - “Zero Waste to Landfill” for Dublin Airport - Increased at-source segregation - Drive innovation and sustainability with suppliers - Drive waste minimisation - Educate and influence staff, suppliers and tenants
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Musgraves' strategic principles in relation to management of wastes are: - To focus on waste reduction/minimisation rather than treatment solutions - To manage waste more efficiently - To instil best-practice in waste management at its facilities, at its retail partners’ stores and among its consumers.
MEMBERS LIST
View a full list of our Retail Members